When special needs should include a nice haircut

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When special needs should include a nice haircut
Direct Link To This Post phil March 18 2001 at 8:08am  Quote phil Quote  Post Reply Reply
In my line of work I encounter many people with special needs, and one thing which strikes me is the complete lack of imagination shown by their carers as regards appearance, particularly hair. When was the last time you saw a person with, say, Down`s Syndrome sporting a snappy, up-to-the minute hairstyle? Not often. It`s usually an unattractive bowl chop (female) or side part (male). I makes me wonder - do they think it doesn`t really matter? If so, they are doing that section of society a big disfavor.
Fortunately, attitudes toward the less able are opening up all the time, yet if those with responsiblity could only see it, they could afford their charges more dignity and less conspicuousness if they could ensure they were not always seen as "different" from the back, also.
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Direct Link To This Post duke April 03 2001 at 6:25pm  Quote duke Quote  Post Reply Reply
Reply to message: 10.3287.1
I`ve been thinking of your point for awhile Phil - you may be on to something. Several factors
may play part of the caregiver/haircutter`s style given to the subject:

-low maintenance
-they think the person is "not worth" the care, being "ugly" from the start
-they DO think it looks good

At any rate, while some of these people may not really need fancy `dos (eg - they`re not corporate
executives who feel they have to have a very business-oriented style) they certainly deserve
the same care re their hair as anyone else. I may post a related post regarding childrens` hair...
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Direct Link To This Post ScarletWitch December 28 2001 at 4:32pm  Quote ScarletWitch Quote  Post Reply Reply
My understanding is that Down`s Syndrome hair is next to impossible to style, being straight and silky, which might partially account for that. My sister has a condition similar to Down`s and her hair is stick straight and baby fine. She wears it all one length to about the middle of her back and keeps it a beautiful blonde color, but then she makes her own decisions and does not have a caretaker. Some people`s idea of attractive (like my mother) is "clean and out of the face".
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Direct Link To This Post Iceman4757 January 02 2002 at 5:43pm  Quote Iceman4757 Quote  Post Reply Reply
Originally posted by phil phil wrote:

In my line of work I encounter many people with special needs, and one thing which strikes me is the complete lack of imagination shown by their carers as regards appearance, particularly hair. When was the last time you saw a person with, say, Down's Syndrome sporting a snappy, up-to-the minute hairstyle? Not often. It's usually an unattractive bowl chop (female) or side part (male). I makes me wonder - do they think it doesn't really matter? If so, they are doing that section of society a big disfavor.
Fortunately, attitudes toward the less able are opening up all the time, yet if those with responsiblity could only see it, they could afford their charges more dignity and less conspicuousness if they could ensure they were not always seen as "different" from the back, also.

I can remember back a few years ago when I was getting a haircut and they brought in a few people with Downs Syndrome. The first one to get a haircut was a guy and he jumped in the chair but when he saw what she was going to do he started to scream and kick and his caretaker had to comfort him. The stylist had a hard time giving him a haircut but she did a very good job, needless to say when it was time for the neck shave and trimming around the ears with the clippers, he started screaming and tried to jump from the chair, knocking the clippers out of the sytlists hand. I just wonder if part of it is that they get kind of squirmish and scared of haircuts so thats why they dont get the fancy stylish do`s.

Now I have seen a few female downs with some nice stylish hair styles. My daughter has a little girl in her class that has downs and she enjoys getting her haircut and always has pretty styles.
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Direct Link To This Post Laura_uk January 06 2002 at 8:57pm  Quote Laura_uk Quote  Post Reply Reply
Hi, I had a horrible situation years ago when I was training. A friend of mine who was a carer came in to the salon with the girl she was looking after. Some older women who were in the salon made horrible comments such as "they shouldn`t really be in here" We all felt terrible and simply ignored the comments, but maybe salons are another place where some people are alienated from? I hope things are changing. I`ve seen some gorgeous little girls who have special needs so I think the problem is decreasing with the older generations.

It goes with their dress also, maybe its a question of creating them as something "other" than "us" when they are dressed differently or badly. I`m sure things are changing though.

Laura
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Direct Link To This Post LiliBeach January 05 2003 at 9:10pm  Quote LiliBeach Quote  Post Reply Reply
I am a hairstylist. My cousin Racheal, who pasted away last Feburary, always loved her long blonde hair. She loved brushing it and styling it. She was a beautiful woman with Down Syndrome. Unfortunatly she was an execption.

Alot of families with a Down Syndrome child cannot get attiquate medical insurance because most insurance companies will not cover them. Therefore alot of thier medical expenses are placed on the family. With such a short supply of money left over for luxuries like haircare, they end up cutting it themselves or going to the local chain salon "chop shop".

I personally have some "special" clients whom I give a discount for. I do this on behalf of my special angel in heaven named Racheal.
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