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half-ing commercial hair colour dyes

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Category: Hair Talk
Forum Name: Hair Color
Forum Description: The tricks and tribulations of changing your hair color
URL: http://talk.hairboutique.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=37043
Printed Date: July 31 2014 at 10:32am


Topic: half-ing commercial hair colour dyes
Posted By: Scntillatedseed
Subject: half-ing commercial hair colour dyes
Date Posted: November 08 2005 at 8:38pm
So i've bought a commerical hair-dye and since I'm a guy with short hair and a rather spendthrift one, I was thinking of cutting the bottles mixture usage in half. 

One problem I was wondering that i may run into is that will it still work to hte same efficacy, as I've had some problems with the hair dye taking to my hair.  But I'm thinking it's just because my hair's a lot thicker than others and the fact htat i sucked at distributing the dye through ym hair evenly. 

Another reason why I think it woudl effect the dye is because I believe a certain amount of chemicals is required to get a certain reaction in the product.  And I think the companies designed the mixture to a specific amount as to allow it to be of the utmost effectiveness.  BUt that's just what I'm presuming.  Do hair-stylists use a certain amoutn of dye regardless fo the customers hair length to attain the certain colour because of hte chemicals reactants?  Or do they jsut do this b/c this is just the amount of mixture thats required to attain a cretain colour? 

Well, in essence my question is simply, will things work out the same if I were to mix in half of the required mixture rather than using it in full?  WIll it affect the way the colour takes to my hair noticably?



Replies:
Posted By: Claude
Date Posted: November 08 2005 at 10:22pm

Originally posted by Scntillatedseed Scntillatedseed wrote:

So i've bought a commerical hair-dye and since I'm a guy with short hair and a rather spendthrift one, I was thinking of cutting the bottles mixture usage in half. 

One problem I was wondering that i may run into is that will it still work to hte same efficacy, as I've had some problems with the hair dye taking to my hair.  But I'm thinking it's just because my hair's a lot thicker than others and the fact htat i sucked at distributing the dye through ym hair evenly. 

Another reason why I think it woudl effect the dye is because I believe a certain amount of chemicals is required to get a certain reaction in the product.  And I think the companies designed the mixture to a specific amount as to allow it to be of the utmost effectiveness.  BUt that's just what I'm presuming.  Do hair-stylists use a certain amoutn of dye regardless fo the customers hair length to attain the certain colour because of hte chemicals reactants?  Or do they jsut do this b/c this is just the amount of mixture thats required to attain a cretain colour? 

Well, in essence my question is simply, will things work out the same if I were to mix in half of the required mixture rather than using it in full?  WIll it affect the way the colour takes to my hair noticably?

I've never used boxed haircolor but typically I think those are measured out to be used together in full for one application of color to someone's hair. I wouldn't try to mix half and half and NEVER, EVER mix different brands of haircolor or different types of haircolor such as a permanent color and semi-permanent color to try and create a new shade.

I only use professional products but typically permanent haircolor is a 1:1 mix ratio. For example if you measure our 40 mls or Developer you should mix in 40 mls of haircolor with that to give you 80mls a 1:1 ratio.

G'luck



Posted By: FunnyGirl
Date Posted: November 09 2005 at 6:55am
Originally posted by Claude Claude wrote:

I only use professional products but typically permanent haircolor is a 1:1 mix ratio. For example if you measure our 40 mls or Developer you should mix in 40 mls of haircolor with that to give you 80mls a 1:1 ratio.

G'luck

I'm going to have to partly disagree with that.  Though all hair dyes ask for a 1:1 ratio, it really depends on the brand.  For example, Majirel's (a professional hair dye from L'Oral) ratio is a 1:1, however it's a 50 g tube for a 75 ml bottle of developer, that to them is a 1:1 ratio.  The same is true for Evolution of the Color (a professional hair dye from Alfaparf), where their 1:1 ratio is a 60 ml tube to a 90 ml bottle of developer. 

I don't think if you half your dye it'll cause any problems.  So long as you maintain the 1:1 ratio.  In example, a box of Lumia (from Garnier) contains a 45 g tube of dye and a 67,5 ml of developer.  I don't think the dye would be any less effective if you used half and half.  I should warn you though, if you don't have much experience with dyeing your hair, it's better to have more dye than miss spots of your hair.  I suggest you use the whole box at first, and then when you get the hang of it you can use less amounts of dye and still be able to perfectly cover your hair.  These commercial dyes usually say that 1 box is enough for shoulder length hair, however you also have to consider the amount of hair you have on your head and not only its length.  That said, if gray hair's what you're trying to cover, make sure you use a permanent hair dye, that's the only one that will give you full coverage.  Also, if your plan is to color your hair more than 2 shades lighter than your natural color, you should try those high lift colors, because otherwise you'll never get the desired effect.

Let's say your hair is a medium brown (a number 4) and you want to color it a dark blonde (a number 6).  If you use a number 6 color with a 20 vl. developer, you should get the desired result.  However, if you're looking to go from a number 4 to a number 7 (medium blonde), then you would need a 30 vl. developer to lift the color of your hair 3 times.  If that is your objetive you should look for a high lift hair dye, which should have a 30 vl. or 40 vl. developer.

That said, make sure you follow the instructions right, leaving the dye on for the amount of time instructed.  If you feel a bit insecure about applying it evenly, you should practice by using conditioner on your hair as if you were dying it.  Hope this helps.  Good luck. ^^



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Fnn Gr


Posted By: Scntillatedseed
Date Posted: November 09 2005 at 7:33am
wait wait, what's with with 20 vl. developers?  This isn't my first time, I was just wondering, and I believe I just have some rather thick hair, which makes dying it to a certain colour a pain, at least with box dyes. 

Well I've dyed my hair, and how annoying, the product hat was labeled "exclusively for dark hair" didn't quite take to my dark hair -_-.  I wonder if its high-lift lemme go check!  *sifts through hsi garbage* 

Yes it is, it's called a hi-lift browns.  And my hair is ... nothing like it is on the box!!  I certainly used enough dye, although there were loads left.  I don't have nearly as much hair so that shouldn't be an issue. 

And how would i tell if what I was bringing my hair colour to is 2 shades lighter?  The colour on the box says It's a b51 and I have black hair.  I'm probably going to wait a few weeks and dye my hair again.  Any reccomendations for where and what products I should buy that works well?  Also, is there any way I could get that dying cap that them professionals use? 


Posted By: FunnyGirl
Date Posted: November 09 2005 at 8:38am

The volume of the developer indicates how many shades the hair dye will lighten your hair.  A 20 volume developer can only make your hair 2 shades lighter, a 30 volume developer can only make your hair up to 3 shades lighter, and so on. 

Color is categorized by numbers, 1 being the darkest and 10 the lightest (though it can go as light as 12). 

1 - black, 2 - darkest brown, 3 - dark brown, 4 - medium brown, 5 - light brown, 6 - dark blonde, 7 - medium blonde, 8 - light blonde, 9 - lightest blonde, 10 - platinum blonde (almost white)

You say the color you chose was B51, the 1 indicates that it's an ash color (brown is the color of your hair, and ash is the reflection your hair will have).  So in other words, 51 is a light ash brown.  The B is probably used to help consumers see that it's a high-lift dye.  Any number that comes after the first is simply indicating the reflection your hair will have (or at least should have).

1 - ash, 2 - silver, 3 - golden, 4 - copper, 5 - red violet, 6 - red

So, say you want a medium golden brown, you would opt for a 53.  Of course the end result also depends on your starting haircolor.  If your hair is black, it could be either a blue black or a red black.  If you want a golden tone to it and your hair is blue black, you should stick to golden tones, however, if you don't want a golden effect and your hair is red black, then you should stick with ash colors. 

You're on the right track, you picked a high-lift color to lighten your black hair.  Your hair being black, it's a 1 and you want it to be a number 5.  That means you would have to lift it 4 shades to get the desired result.  I don't know what developer they provided in a box, but in order for you to go from 1 to 5 you need a 40 volume developer.  Try using half the tube of the dye and all of the developer, you might be able to get a different result.  If that doesn't work, try the B61.  But you must remember, your hair will not lighten where it was previously colored, so you'll probably only see more results on the roots.  Also, do a strand test first to see if you like the result.  Hope this helps.  Good luck. ^^

 



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Fnn Gr


Posted By: KellyH
Date Posted: November 09 2005 at 9:11am
I've halved commercial and professional products many times. I do it when I want to spot-change certain areas I'm not happy with. Just do it before you mix it and leave the unused portions alone. Check the ratio of the volumes of the color AND developer for the commercial kits. If they're equal.....then it's easy. I also suggest using proper measuring tools.....don't 'eye ball' it.

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Posted By: claribuzz
Date Posted: November 09 2005 at 10:36am

black hair is very resistant if you want to dye it brown, but can easily be dyed red. this due to the pigments in the hair.

since you have and maintain short hair, why dont you bleached your hair then dyed it brown. i mean you dont have to bleached it till blonde, just till its orange and red. then use an ash brown shade to achieved a neutral brown color that can be seen.



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ARGHH


Posted By: Rebekah
Date Posted: November 09 2005 at 7:24pm

Liquid dyes are best used completely as soon as opened.  Once you open a liquid dye, believe it or not, the air begins to react with it!  The cream tube dyes are the best to use when trying to "save" on color. 

I actually "waste" half the bottle of liquid dye every time I touch up my roots because I don't need it.  I have also noticed that when I tried to save that dye for next time, it's a lot darker! 

 




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