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Texturizing shears and fine hair?

Printed From: HairBoutique.com
Category: Hair Talk
Forum Name: General Hair Talk
Forum Description: A free wheeling discussion of hair related topics.
URL: http://talk.hairboutique.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=50709
Printed Date: September 01 2014 at 6:11am


Topic: Texturizing shears and fine hair?
Posted By: CarrieM
Subject: Texturizing shears and fine hair?
Date Posted: March 03 2007 at 11:11am
Hello,
My hairstylist has used texturizing shears the last couple of times she has cut my hair, which is short and layered.  My hair is very fine, and many stylists have told me it's hard to cut.  It's never looked as thin as it does now, and it's driving me crazy because it's looked much thicker with past styles, and it's also hard for me to deal with because it just lays there and has no volume.  I'm assuming it's due to the texturizing shears.  I didn't think texturizing/thinning shears were meant for use on fine hair?  I'm wondering if that's the main reason my hair looks so thin and is hard for me to deal with.  If I told my stylist I want no texturizing and blunt ends, would that help my problem?  Thanks!



Replies:
Posted By: julesyjul88
Date Posted: March 05 2007 at 2:38am
I think it would help.Blunt ends seem to not make hair look as thin as say thinning shears or even razor cutting.In fact,i have never heard of texturizing shears,but I'am not a stylist.
I have been recommending this alot lately,but you should try NIOXIN 3 part hair system (found at most salons) if fine,flat hair is your problem. It is a bit on the expensive side 40 bucks (includes shampoo,conditioner,and scalp treatment)
I have never had such thick hair in my life EVER and I just started using it last thursday. My hair is also fine and often flat.


Posted By: PlutoPowered
Date Posted: March 08 2007 at 4:31pm
Originally posted by CarrieM CarrieM wrote:

Hello,
My hairstylist has used texturizing shears the last couple of times she has cut my hair, which is short and layered.  My hair is very fine, and many stylists have told me it's hard to cut.  It's never looked as thin as it does now, and it's driving me crazy because it's looked much thicker with past styles, and it's also hard for me to deal with because it just lays there and has no volume.  I'm assuming it's due to the texturizing shears.  I didn't think texturizing/thinning shears were meant for use on fine hair?  I'm wondering if that's the main reason my hair looks so thin and is hard for me to deal with.  If I told my stylist I want no texturizing and blunt ends, would that help my problem?  Thanks!
 
Fine straight hair is hard to cut because you see every single line you put in the hair with the shears.  Texturizing shears may help your hair lay better and they may also give some volume when styling.  They will also blend everything together.  They don't have to be used but they can be helpful (to anyone's hair).
 
Razor cutting can help as it cuts the ends of the hair on an angle and gives them a little more bounce but I don't know many stylist that know how to do that (or do it often).
 
I would suggest to your stylist your concerns and see what they can do.  If it isn't working, you can always try other stylists.  Find a stylist that has similar hair to yours as they usually REALLY know how to deal with your type of hair as they've - been there / done that - with their own hair
 


Posted By: Rocky
Date Posted: March 11 2007 at 10:48pm
Originally posted by CarrieM CarrieM wrote:

Hello,
If I told my stylist I want no texturizing and blunt ends, would that help my problem?  Thanks!
 
It really does depend on your hair and hairstyle.  However, based on what you've described, I'd say your assessment of the problem is correct.  I think it would help if your stylist stayed away from the texturing/thinning shear on your hair. 
 
If you have thin hair, unless the style you've chosen demands it, why on earth would you use a thinning shear to remove more weight?  In the case of thin, fine, straight hair, this tool will not add volume.  Rather, it removes weight and volume.
 
Another post correctly pointed out a thinning shear can sometimes be used as a short-cut to get fine, straight hair to blend well.   I prefer to take the time to cut this type of hair so it blends well without using this tool.  Instead, I'll use graduation and over direction to control the way the hair moves and blends.   This hair type is sometimes difficult to cut.  However, a good stylist should take the time to do it without compromise.
 
 



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