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Don't tell stylist how to cut hair???

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b.k. View Drop Down
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    Posted: February 28 2004 at 5:24pm
On a website that talks about etiquette between a client and stylist, one rule says this

It is an insult to tell your stylist how to cut your hair, you would never dream of telling your doctor/dentist what to do. Yet, it is okay to express a preference, as in if you prefer scissors to a razor cut or vice versa.

http://www.salonsearch.com/looksNewsdetail.php?id=26

I don't understand, if you don't tell your stylist how to cut your hair, then you risk ending up with something you hate! I have long hair, and the first thing they'd do if I didn't tell them how to cut it would be to cut it short.
Can anyone explain what the website means?
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StyleGuy View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote StyleGuy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 28 2004 at 7:38pm
I read that website, and well, I think it's Stylists that need to be taken to task on this one.

Insulted because someone had the nerve to make a request about their own hair? Sheesh.

The mature consultation I referred to in an earlier post is the responsibility of both Stylist and Client, and when you consider that most Stylists have been Clients, but most Clients have not been Stylists, I think the onus should be on the Stylist to keep the consultation mature. I have no patience for high-strung Stylists who huff when a client dares to input.

Once again, it's common courtesy on the part of both Stylist and Client. It's not a power struggle, it's a haircut/color! All that is required is for the Stylist to listen to the Client's concerns and suggestions, and take them into account when making recommendations.

How about we both move away from confrontation, and towards genuine consultation?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote duke Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 29 2004 at 4:45am
That article is badly written. I don't think it's saying clearly what it means. I think they mean you shouldn't coach the stylist about the technique. However I am not sure.

It's not an article I would recommend anyway.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 01 2004 at 6:08pm
What it says is that you shouldn't tell your stylist how to cut hair, not what style you want your hair cut in. Don't say, "are you using those shears?" or "No, no, cut the back first." or "Clippers? No, do that with scissors."

And the author is right on that one.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote duke Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 02 2004 at 2:52am
I think the author is half-right. I agree that you should not give the stylist technique pointers, but I don't think there's anything wrong with giving a precise instruction or two. For example, if you're getting a short "male" haircut, you may want to indicate to the stylist that you want a quiff at the back cut with scissors and not tapered with clippers from the nape up.
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Katie Scarlett View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Katie Scarlett Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 03 2004 at 9:31am
Hair is not the same as teeth. Let's face it, teeth are teeth & the treatments are generally the same for everyone. But everyone's hair is different & we are the ones living with it, so we are the ones who knows what it best responds to, be it styling products or layering or whatever. To suggest that we shouldn't tell our stylists what to do is patently absurd.
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Bill W. View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bill W. Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 04 2004 at 6:48pm
Would you tell a car salesman what you want in a car? Or would you say, " You are the pro, tell me what I need." Just tattoo "sucker across my forehead". Even with a doctor, if the diagnosis and treatment do not match your research of your symptoms, you will speak up and discuss the tests and proposed course of treatment. You are right the article is ludicrous. The stylist is dealing with a crisis dealing with self worth. Did he graduated from a high school career program because his/her SAT scores were too low for community college and therefore feel inadequate compared to the college kids? Comparing yourself to a doctor with even a 2 year associate's degree vs 8+ years of college plus residency is definately a case of arrogance and dellusion. In any situation you need to understand you meet the needs of your customers, clients, patients, etc. and if you do not respect them as people, you will be out of business! No matter how the tech school teacher praised you for agreeing with her ideas.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote StyleGuy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 04 2004 at 8:51pm
Well, Bill W, I think that is really harsh.

You've basically stereotyped stylists as lacking in self-worth, unintelligent, inadequate, delusional, and arrogant. Hopefully, for you, the next stylist/barber who does your hair won't know how you feel.

Personally, I think we should be grateful that there are people that have passion for medicine, law, policing, teaching, clothing design, hair design and so on. Just because someone didn't take 10 years of university education doesn't mean they don't deserve respect.

But most importantly, that respect needs to go BOTH WAYS. Stylists need to respect clients. Without them they would not have income. Clients need to respect stylists/barbers. Not everybody wants and is able to cut their own hair. Stylists don't need to be insulted, just because a client makes a specific request. Ask yourself why is this customer trying to give input? What are his or her concerns? How can I meet them.

And the client doesn't need to treat the stylist like an idiot, either. You'll get a much better result if you show respect for the stylist.

Again, I ask. Why does every human interaction have to be confrontation, with a declared winner and loser?
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Captain Japonica View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Captain Japonica Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 07 2004 at 5:00pm
I don't know, I think it makes their job easier, actually. Whenever I tell the barber/stylist that I prefer that they use clippers on my hair, I just see this look of calm releif settle over their faces. Things actually go better if you tell them EXACTLY what you want in very plain language.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bill W Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 11 2004 at 6:50pm
Style guy, I am not being harsh, I am dealing with reality. If you please your customers, listen to them and give them what they came for, you will get repeat business. If you disrespect them, they will go elsewhere. Even if you have 8 + years of pre-med and residency, as well as a few years of practice under your belt, you still have to respect your patients' research. The internet gives them access to Harvard doctors that have 25 +years of teaching. Hair stylists are known for arrogance. I know many long haired women that if they sat on a jury and the hairdresser was killed would consider it justifiable homicide. Like a car salesman that gets by 70+% of the time pushing their wares to the general public, 30% will not tolerate it. That 30% will poison the water and over time 30% of the 30% will be too small a client base to stay in business.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote StyleGuy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 12 2004 at 12:24am
In this last post, you are contending an argument that no one is debating. I see no evidence here that anyone is advocating that a stylist should disregard a customer's input. In fact, if you read every one of my previous posts, I've talked about respecting and listening to clients.

But in a previous post, here is a direct quote from you

Quote he stylist is dealing with a crisis dealing with self worth. Did he graduated from a high school career program because his/her SAT scores were too low for community college and therefore feel inadequate compared to the college kids?


You claim that you are `dealing with reality'. Just where is the research that supports this statement? That isn't reality, that is nothing but offensive stereotyping. This is what I find excessively harsh.
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YuppyMan View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote YuppyMan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 12 2004 at 8:04am
Here's a practical example. Regardless of where I've gone for a haircut, telling the hairdresser/stylist/barber that I didn't want my fringe/bangs point-cutted has always made them mad. Is that a fair request or do they really know better?

I much prefer someone to have a complete idea of what they have to do, rather than just asking as they go along.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote duke Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 12 2004 at 8:05am
No, I don't think that's an unreasonable request. Wonder what's the stylist's problem there.
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YuppyMan View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote YuppyMan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 17 2004 at 6:05pm
Usually the objection is that they think I want a blunt line (apparently blunt lines are *EVIL* in the eyes of hairdressers :) But really I just wanted to keep the hair long so I could gel it backwards.
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A hairstylist View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote A hairstylist Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 13 2004 at 4:39pm
I am a hairstylist and I've trained with a master stylist/platform artist who charged $225 for a haircut and a blow dry. I've been through almost nine years of college and almost have two degrees in biology and psychology. I made Deans List and Presidential Honors during my school career. I could of gone to any school I wanted. I chose a career in hair as one of my careers due to my interest in art. So I don't think anyone should stereotype a hairstylist as someone who could not attain a higher education. The other point I'd like to make is that a good stylist, in my opinion finds out what a clients needs are, then they make suggestions, clients either accept or reject suggestion, and then before the cut begins they agree on the outcome of the hair together. There are no suprises in the outcomes of my haircuts. When it comes to clipper vs. scissor or razor, I offer the tool I'd like to use and always ask my clients, if they offer a preference I always comply, but I don't feel a client should tell me the technique to use while I cut. I don't mean choppy vs blunt. I mean telling me as I go through a haircut, to cut here or cut there. There is a certain level of professional respect and trust that I expect. If you don't trust my skills and ability, then why are you sitting with me, because you can get out of the chair before the cut begins. I don't tell a doctor where to put the stethoscope, I tell him I have a cough, I don't tell a mechanic where on a tube deep in an engine he should check, I tell him I'm hearing a noise from deep with-in. As a professional stylist who is liscensed through the state, I don't feel I should be walked-over or told how I should do what I do in terms of actually cutting the hair. That is like telling an artist who paints when to put a certain shade of color on a portrait when they are doing a painting of you. Let them do their work. That is what I think the article was referring to. I'm sorry if I was a little charged or aggressive, but I don't like being stereotyped.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bill w Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 14 2004 at 5:35pm
A hairstylist, sounds like you are on the ball and well above the average. As such I'm sure you will agree the average stylist doesn't have your qualifications and outlook. And unfortunately they still reflect your profession, good or bad. I considered a career as a stylist but my present calling still challenges me and I feel this is where God wants me to be. No matter the profession, there are those who are below par who think they are better than they are, that no matter how poorly they perform, they still consider themselves artists. How would you feel if you had a public defender who was a drunk or a pervert obsessed with chasing little girls deciding the future of your National Security? or whether or not you spent the next 75 years in jail? Scary...Well we have had those in positions making policy... And yes bad performance casts a bad reflection on all. And it depends on how much you have to lose, how much you trust those who have power over you.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dianefromcanada Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 14 2004 at 10:10pm
I totally agree that one shouldn't tell a stylist how to cut hair but all means communicate with the stylish about the style you wish to wear.

One doesn't tell the doctor how to examine the patient but certainly the patient explain the problem and what they expect from the appointment.
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